‘Economic crises is no excuse for climate inaction’

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‘Economic crises is no excuse for climate inaction’
Renew Kyoto now, UN boss yells
Suleiman Mustapha, Durban, South Africa
United Nations Secretary Genera,l Ban Ki-moon has urged deadlocked climate talks in Durban to work urgently for solutions, adding that the future of the planet was at stake.
The global economic crisis is no excuse for countries to delay an international fund to help countries combat the effects of climate change, the UN boss said.
"It would be difficult to overstate the gravity of this moment," Ban said at the opening of the High Level Forum of the 17th Conference of Parties of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) in Durban, South Africa.
"Without exaggeration, we can say: the future of our planet is at stake - people's lives, the health of the global economy, the very survival of some nations."
The 12-day talks under the (UNFCCC) have been hamstrung by a row over the future of the Kyoto Protocol, the world's only legally-binding treaty for curbing greenhouses gases blamed for climate change.
"I urge you to carefully consider a second commitment period under the Kyoto Protocol,"Mr Ban said, obviously in support of the African and other developing countries position.
“On the now and the immediate, we need to agree on the adoption of a second commitment period of the Kyoto Protocol, as well as the possibility of an enhanced mechanisms and to decide on the eligibility for participation in these enhanced mechanisms”, he said.
According to the Mr Ban Ki-moon, all parties to the conference need to be assured that adequate and sustainable long term funding will be delivered  and that the implementation  of all agreements will continue without an implementation gap occurring.
Pointing to economic problems and "abiding political differences" about how to tackle climate change, the UN boss said everyone had to be "realistic" about the chances of a breakthrough in Durban.
The Secretary-General said, the link with the funding, technology transfer, mechanisms and networks and capacity building for real and tangible adaptation actions must be established. “This will give effects to the agreement that equal priority must be given to adaption and mitigation,” the UN boss said.
"It may be true, as many say: the ultimate goal of a comprehensive and binding climate-change agreement may be beyond our reach, for now," Mr Ban said.
"Yet let me emphasise: None of these uncertainties should prevent us from making real progress here in Durban."

Renew Kyoto now, UN boss yells

Suleiman Mustapha

zumaUnited Nations Secretary Genera,l Ban Ki-moon has urged deadlocked climate talks in Durban to work urgently for solutions, adding that the future of the planet was at stake.

The global economic crisis is no excuse for countries to delay an international fund to help countries combat the effects of climate change, the UN boss said.

"It would be difficult to overstate the gravity of this moment," Ban said at the opening of the High Level Forum of the 17th Conference of Parties of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) in Durban, South Africa.

"Without exaggeration, we can say: the future of our planet is at stake - people's lives, the health of the global economy, the very survival of some nations."

The 12-day talks under the (UNFCCC) have been hamstrung by a row over the future of the Kyoto Protocol, the world's only legally-binding treaty for curbing greenhouses gases blamed for climate change.

"I urge you to carefully consider a second commitment period under the Kyoto Protocol,"Mr Ban said, obviously in support of the African and other developing countries position.

“On the now and the immediate, we need to agree on the adoption of a second commitment period of the Kyoto Protocol, as well as the possibility of an enhanced mechanisms and to decide on the eligibility for participation in these enhanced mechanisms”, he said.

According to the Mr Ban Ki-moon, all parties to the conference need to be assured that adequate and sustainable long term funding will be delivered  and that the implementation  of all agreements will continue without an implementation gap occurring.

Pointing to economic problems and "abiding political differences" about how to tackle climate change, the UN boss said everyone had to be "realistic" about the chances of a breakthrough in Durban.

The Secretary-General said, the link with the funding, technology transfer, mechanisms and networks and capacity building for real and tangible adaptation actions must be established. “This will give effects to the agreement that equal priority must be given to adaption and mitigation,” the UN boss said.

"It may be true, as many say: the ultimate goal of a comprehensive and binding climate-change agreement may be beyond our reach, for now," Mr Ban said.

"Yet let me emphasise: None of these uncertainties should prevent us from making real progress here in Durban."

 

 

 

 

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